Bowl Rock, Trencrom, Lelant, Zennor

Record ID:  93868 / MNA169456
Record type:  Monument
Protected Status: None Recorded
NT Property:  Zennor Sites; South West
Civil Parish:  None Recorded
Grid Reference:  SW 5226 3674
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Summary

A large rounded natural granite boulder beside the Trevethoe-Balnoon road, being the Giant’s Bowl, presumably one of the stones which the giant of Trencrom, threw or rolled down from the hill which rises above to the south-west.

Identification Images (0)

Monument Types

  • NATURAL FEATURE (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1900 AD)

Description

A large rounded natural granite boulder beside the Trevethoe-Balnoon road. This is the ‘Giant’s Bowl’ recorded by JO Halliwell in 1861 (77; Appendix 2), presumably one of the stones which the giant of Trencrom, threw or rolled down from the hill which rises above to the south-west.

The road ran along what is now a green lane to the rock’s north until some time in the 20th century when it was diverted to the south to accommodate the needs of motor vehicles. A cottage to its east is called Bowl Rock Cottage and an outhouse is shown just 3m east of the rock on the 1st and 2nd editions of the OS 1:2500. This has been removed.

The stone is c5m E-W by c4m N-S, and c2.5m high. There are nine steps in its west side - simple rounded sockets to ease climbing to the top - where there is a small hole, probably a merriment hole, with lead plugging, perhaps to take a flag or similar. Also on the west side are inscriptions, some now difficult to make out, but which include the following:

32 SB 1810
IR 173[?]
I.C.

There may also be an inscription (letter I?) near the bottom of the stone on its east side. The light was not good when the stone was inspected for this survey, and the northern side is obscured by dense vegetation.

It is clear that the stone, a dramatic natural feature, not only attracted local giant-related folk lore but was also a place where people gathered in the 18th and 19th centuries for pleasure or amusement. A stone-faced earth wall, no doubt part of the modern road improvement scheme, running up to the rock’s E and W sides, replaced a hedge which ran further to the south, leaving the rock clear on the verge of the old road, and easily accessible to both local people and to travellers.

References

  • SNA64882 - National Trust Report: Peter Herring. 1999. Trencrom, Lelant - Archaeological and historical assessment. Zennor..

Designations

None Recorded

Other Statuses and References

None Recorded

Associated Events

  • ENA6288 - Field Survey, Trencrom, Lelant - Archaeological and Historical Assessment. Zennor

Associated Finds

None Recorded

Related Records

None Recorded