Farmhouse, Tongue House Farm, Duddon

Record ID:  26271 / MNA117564
Record type:  Building
Protected Status: World Heritage Site
NT Property:  Duddon Valley; North
Civil Parish:  Dunnerdale-with-Seathwaite; South Lakeland; Cumbria
Grid Reference:  SD 2362 9746
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Summary

The main portion of the farmhouse is a simple rectangular block with a layout similar to many other medium sized 17th century farmhouses. A notable feature is the press cupboard set into the wall between the firehouse and the divided pantry / parlour end. An outshot was added to the house in the 19th century, housing the present kitchen and pantry.

Identification Images (0)

Monument Types

  • FARMHOUSE (Late 17th C to Early 21st century - 1691 AD to 2050 AD (between))

Description

The main portion of the farmhouse is a simple rectangular block with a layout similar to many other medium sized 17th century farmhouses. A notable feature is the press cupboard set into the wall between the firehouse and the divided pantry / parlour end. Although the cupboard is undated a piece of wood previously used as skirting in the parlour was dated c. 1691. Only the date could be salvaged and was subsequently set above the door of the outshot (referred to as the front door by Mrs Williamson). An outshot was added to the house in the 19th century, housing the present kitchen and pantry.

IMPORTANT FEATURES - Press cupboard, old doors and panelling, ceiling beam positions of ground floor and large fire window, Walna Scar slate floor and porch.

ROOF - There is no internal access to the roof space. From the outside the roof would seem to have been reslated in the mid to late 19th century when the outshot was added, black ceramic ridge tiles are used in both sections. From the inside it would seem that the tie beams have been raised.

WALLS - Because of render and limewash it is only possible to see the construction of the eastern gable wall. The main house has flatways quoins with cobbles and quarried stone walling, the outshot has a higher percentage of cobbles. Originally the south wall would have been considered the front of the buildings. This has a continuous drip course stepped up over the Walna Scar slate porch.

DETAILS -

FIRE HOUSE - The fire house can be identified by a beam or bressomer close to one of the gable walls, in this case the west end. This would originally have carried a lath and plaster smoke hood, under which the fire would have been lit. As is usual this has been replaced by a fireplace and flue in the modern fashion (the surround is mid 20th century in this case). No sign could be found of a gable entrance although one may be revealed when plaster or render is stripped for renewal. A spice cupboard was traditional on the side of the fireplace nearest the front of the house. If a carved door ever existed here it had been removed by the time the present tenants moved in; they put to the existing glazed doors to keep the shelves free of dust.

A plain slate slab floor is hidden in this room by a carpet, this contrasts with the Walna Scar slab floor which runs from the porch to just beyond the door. The joists are ceiled, the fire bressomer has a run off chamfer at both ends, but the chamfer on the central beam runs into the wall at either end. A portion of this last beam has been removed, the exact reason was not clear but it may have been related to a central staircase, since removed. A 19th century cupboard is built back to back with another in an old doorway.

HALLWAY - Reslated Scar slate floor previously mentioned. This must post date the insertion of the wall on the fire house side, of which this was once part. Unfortunately it was not possible to determine whether there were originally two or three doors in the montin and plank wall. Only a short section of montin and plank has survived, this is of simple design.

PRESS CUPBOARD - Regrettably this example is undated, but it is of a design common throughout the 17th century more especially the latter half of the century, and 1691 is a possible date.

DEVELOPMENT - Outlined at the beginning. A half level window above the present bathroom window may be linked to an earlier staircase although one in this position would be extremely unusual. The present layout of the main house is thought to be the basic plan from which all subsequent Lakeland houses developed. This is an unusually well preserved and relatively rare example of a three bay internal staircase house.

(NT VBS SURVEYOR; 1986)

References

  • SZI50236 - Vernacular Building Survey: Martin Higgins. 01/08/1986. Vernacular building survey of Tongue House Farm, Duddon.

Designations

Other Statuses and References

None Recorded

Associated Events

  • ENA1460 - Field Survey, Vernacular Building Survey, Tongue House Farm, Duddon Valley, 1986

Associated Finds

None Recorded

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